Alaska Takes Hit on Halibut Quota in 2018

2018 Sport Halibut Fishing Quotas

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Please click the link above to read the story at our sister site, www.halibutchronicles.com

In S.E. Alaska chartered sport halibut anglers have a new slot limit for halibut. Anglers can catch halibut up to 38 inches, a reduction of six inches from last season, or over 80-inches. This reduction in size on the lower slot limit is due to a declining stock of halibut.

How they decide size limits. Fisheries managers first decide on a pounds quota. In this year’s case the quota is reduced by about 25%. They then look at how many  halibut were caught on guided trips. Every guided trip MUST fill out their logbook, which clearly accounts for every halibut landed. Since they have very accurate numbers of halibut caught in a given area, fisheries managers can calculate poundage based on average lengths and weights of the halibut. Then they simply figure out how many pounds the new quota is and go backward from there, calculating what reduced size limit will achieve the new quota goal. In this year’s case, a 38 inch maximum size fish, they estimate, should hold the sport guided fleet to the 2018 quota for the area.

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Hungry Orcas Might Shut Down Part of Strait of Juan de Fuca in Canada

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Orcas are on the decline along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada has proposed a solution — to ban all sport fishing from Sheringham Point to East Point on an experimental basis from May through September 2018.

Fisheries managers claim the initiative would help maintain Chinook salmon populations in essential feeding areas for southern resident Orcas that rely on Chinook salmon to survive.

Lots of people disagree with this Draconian measure. According to Ryan Chamberland, owner of Vancouver Island Lodge near Sooke. He says only 2% of recreational caught salmon is attributed to the Orca’s diet.

Sooke currently pen raises 500,000 Chinook smolt to be released in the Strait, which should help feed the Orcas. Sooke sports anglers say they are doing something to help the Orcas. A sport fishing ban would in fact cost millions of dollars to the British Columbia economy impacting not just sports anglers but dozens of related businesses including lodges, guides, tackle shops, motels, restaurants etc.

Sooke and other local anglers have proposed a bubble zone to DFO fisheries managers. Their plan would mandate sports anglers to move when Orcas go near certain fishing areas in order to give Orcas a clear and quiet zone to feed on salmon.

This sounds all warm and fuzzy, but I can tell you from experience, Orcas don’t much care if anglers are in the area and will continue feeding if there’s salmon there. And while this possible months long closure would save such small numbers of potential Orca food, halibut anglers would be prevented from fishing simply because DFO fisheries managers want to save a few salmon. This, my friends is a slippery slope that makes non anglers “feel good.” In reality it won’t save Orcas.

The real solution is seal and sea lion control. These pennipeds are record high numbers and eat far more salmon than recreational anglers catch. Let’s ban them from eating salmon.

Some have also suggested moving the no fishing boundary in the Strait of Juan de Fuca from French Beach to Sombrio Beach.

By taking a couple kilometers here or there we can preserve those recreational fishery values while still playing a major role for southern resident killer whales,” said Director of Business development for the sports fishing institute of B.C. Martin Paish.

The DFO is taking feedback at ashley.dobko@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

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2018 Washington State Halibut Quota

Washington State Halibut Quota

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Halibut Fishing In Canadian Waters, What You Need To Know To Stay Legal

SquidPro Tackle's Halibut Fishing Chronicles

Here’s the latest information on what you need to do to legally fish in British Columbia Canada waters.

  1. Purchase your B.C. Tidal Waters Fishing License. You can purchase it in B.C. at a dealer or go online and purchase your single day, multiple day or annual license. However, if you purchase an online license you can not fish in Areas   Here’s the link to purchase your license online. B.C. Tidal Water Fishing License Online Purchase Cost for 1 day, $7.35 CND, 3 day, $19.95 CND, 5 day, $32.55 CND, Annual, $106.05 CND All above prices are for ages 16 and up. Also, this online license prohibits non-Canadian license holders from fishing for halibut in Areas 23, 121 & 123. This would apply to halibut anglers departing from Neah Bay either by charter boat or private boat. Halibut anglers who plan to fish these areas MUST purchase their license in person…

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Eagles Of The Ocean

Eagle-Series-4-smI love salmon and halibut fishing. I also love watching eagles soar overhead and then swoop down to grab a quick bite. Here’s a few eagle shots taken over the years while on the water in search of salmon, halibut, rockfish and lingcod.

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New Sensei Flex Rods

This spring my new line of rods will be here and should serve most angler’s needs. My most popular rod, the 6-foot, one piece blue series rod will be available again, but with a new name, Sensei Flex. There’s also a lingcod/rockfish/albacore rod, one piece jig rod, 9-foot downrigger rods & an IM6 8 to 20 pound 9-foot salmon/steelhead rod. Please watch this video showing my one piece jig rod, designed for sensitivity and strength. Whether you want a one piece rod for salmon or halibut, this rod will handle the duty.

This spring my new line of rods will be here and should serve most angler’s needs. My most popular rod, the 6-foot, one piece blue series rod will be available again, but with a new name, Sensei Flex. There’s also a lingcod/rockfish/albacore rod, one piece jig rod, 9-foot downrigger rods & an IM6 8 to 20 pound 9-foot salmon/steelhead rod. Please watch this video showing my one piece jig rod, designed for sensitivity and strength. Whether you want a one piece rod for salmon or halibut, this rod will handle the duty.

This spring my new line of rods will be here and should serve most angler’s needs. My most popular rod, the 6-foot, one piece blue series rod will be available again, but with a new name, Sensei Flex. There’s also a lingcod/rockfish/albacore rod, one piece jig rod, 9-foot downrigger rods & an IM6 8 to 20 pound 9-foot salmon/steelhead rod. Please watch this video showing my one piece jig rod, designed for sensitivity and strength. Whether you want a one piece rod for salmon or halibut, this rod will handle the duty.

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2015 Washington Coastal Salmon Season Set

Pacific Fisheries Management Council Announces 2015 Washington Coast Sport Salmon Fishing Season

Coastal King SalmonA mark-selective Chinook season north of Cape Falcon begins May 30 off the Columbia
River and Westport, and May 16 off La Push and Neah Bay. This fishery ends June 12,
or when 10,000 marked Chinook are caught in all port areas combined.

The recreational fishery north of Cape Falcon opens to all salmon on June 13 and ends
September 30 or when Chinook or coho quotas are reached. The preseason coho quota
for all port areas combined is 150,800. For details, please see the season descriptions on
the Council website at http://www.pcouncil.org.

Washington and Northern Oregon (North of Cape Falcon)

Fisheries north of Cape Falcon (near Nehalem in northern Oregon) depend largely on
Columbia River stocks. Columbia River fall Chinook and coho returns are expected to
return at high levels. However, fisheries were constrained by measures to conserve
Chinook stocks in Puget Sound and coho stocks in the Queets River and the interior
Fraser River Basin.

North of Cape Falcon, there is an overall non-Indian total allowable catch of 131,000
Chinook and 170,000 marked hatchery coho.

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